The 19 Best Places to Find Side Gigs Near Me and Online

It’s no secret that more and more people are turning to freelancing on the side to earn extra money, hone their skills, and maybe even build a business of their own.

Whether you’re just looking to supplement your day job income or eventually strike out on your own, you’ll find dozens websites and marketplaces to connect you with potential clients.

But which ones are the best for you? That depends on your skills and expertise, and also what you want out of your side gig.

Are you looking to earn a few extra bucks this weekend, or is this something you could see yourself doing for a while and racking up some serious cash?

Here are some of the best places to find your first side hustle job, and they all have a unique angle and strategy. Check out the list and see where it makes the most sense for you to set up shop.

1. Steady

Steady is a cool new app and website that consolidates all sorts of “gig economy” opportunities. For example, you can find work from home gigs, flexible “anytime” options, and even regular full- and part-time jobs.

steady app screenshots

In browsing through the listings, I found the usual array of delivery and rideshare gigs, but was pleasantly surprised by some of the other offerings. There were a number of local opportunities I’d never heard of in brand ambassadorship, political advocacy, mystery shopping, transcription, and more.

Steady acts as a portal to all these gigs and gives you a convenient central location to browse. After you create your account, you’ll be able to see everything available online and in your local area.

The app also provides a centralized platform to account for all your various gig earnings, and see which ones are truly the most profitable for you.

Read our full Steady review here.

2. SolidGigs.com

Every day, SolidGigs curates the best freelance jobs in:

  • marketing
  • writing
  • design
  • development

This alone is a huge value-add because it can be incredibly time-consuming to dig through all the available listings on dozens of freelance sites — time you’re not getting paid for.

find side jobs on solidgigs

But where SolidGigs gets even better is an awesome built-in library of resources to help you learn how to best pitch and price your services. This is a platform built by freelancers, for freelancers and is really vested in your success.

SolidGigs is just $2 to try for 30 days.

As the freelance economy continues to grow, this platform can help you sort through the clutter.

3. Fiverr

What can I say? I’ve got a warm place in my heart for the quirky Fiverr marketplace, where many services start at just $5.

I’ve been a Fiverr seller for years and it’s actually where I scored my first freelance editing clients. With a few different gigs, I ended up making over $7000 in my first year on the platform.

What’s cool about Fiverr is that it’s a search engine for services, and in recent years they’ve added a lot more capacity for sellers to charge higher prices with package offerings and even custom offers up to $10,000.

(They’ve also added a Fiverr “Pro” level tier for experienced service providers.)

As a side hustler, you’re free to create listings for whatever service you can provide — and say how many days it will take you to deliver. Think of what type of gateway service would get clients in the door to your world.

In summary:

  • Simple, popular platform
  • Free and easy to get started
  • Rates can be low
Read More :   Quarterly Progress Report - Q2 2018

Click here to learn more and set up your free account.

4. FreeUp

Great at what you do? With a multi-step application, interview, and vetting process, FreeUp.net matches clients from all around the world with workers that represent the top 1% of online freelancers.

The new (established in 2015) freelance marketplace specializes in e-commerce, digital marketing, web development and virtual assistance. You’re free to set your own schedule and rates, sometimes north of $50 an hour depending on your skills.

Payments are made weekly and the company takes a 15% cut for facilitating the connection.

In summary:

  • Best for e-commerce and digital marketing experience
  • Free to join (but you have to be good and get accepted)
  • Mention me, Nick Loper, to expedite your application.

Click here to learn more and apply.

5. Facebook Groups

This is another one of my favorite ways to land clients. How it works is to embed yourself in communities where your target customer is already hanging out, and being as helpful as possible in the comment threads.

On The Side Hustle Show, Gabe Arnold even gave the tip that you can use the search box to find posts where people are asking questions, using search keywords like “help”, “recommendation”, “question”, “?”, “know anyone”, etc.

how to use facebook to find side gigs

Of course, be tactful and try and provide as much public support as you can. Don’t just go in yelling, “Hire me, hire me!”

I have a few friends who have completely mastered this strategy and become the go-to people in their communities for services like podcast editing, website support, virtual assistants, and Facebook ads.

I even landed a few book editing clients by being part of a couple self-publishing groups on Facebook. Do a keyword search for the type of customer you want to serve and see what kind of groups pop up.

In summary:

  • A longer-term strategy
  • Free to get started
  • Can be time-consuming upfront, but hey, if you’re already on Facebook, you might as well plant the seeds

6. FlexJobs

FlexJobs is the leading work from home jobs site. With over 50 career categories, FlexJobs has jobs ranging from entry-level to executive and freelance to full-time.

This is the largest resource for remote jobs, and also includes some expert resources to help in your job search.

FlexJobs charges a nominal monthly fee (save 30% w/ promo code FLEXLIFE) to access their listings, but you’ll easily earn that back and then some with one job.

7. NextDoor

Local social network NextDoor helps you connect with potential clients (i.e. your neighbors) nearby. This platform can be very effective for in-person or local services, such as:

nextdoor find side gigs

Just like on Facebook, keep a pulse on the conversations that are happening in your community, and offer to help wherever you can. Don’t be shy about letting people know what you do in your profile.

Spotify_Logo_RGB_Black-removebg-preview

Suggested Playlist: Local Business Ideas

Money is already flowing through your city, town, and neighborhood. Here are some actionable ways to get it flowing to YOU!

Add to Spotify

8. Contena

An online directory for freelance writers, Contena.co collects the best writing opportunities from around the web and compiles them into one central job board.

What I like about Contena is that the writing jobs here usually pay well — for instance, you might find requests ranging from $150 up to even $1000 an article. Now of course to command those prices you’ve got to deliver great work and know what you’re doing.

What I don’t like about Contena is it’s not free, and they’re not particularly upfront about it. (You can create an account for free, but to actually pitch the jobs, you’ve got to pay up — $99 a month for 6 months.)

Pro Tip: Use coupon code Sidehustle15 for 15% off any membership!

Read More :   Quarterly Progress Report Q2 2017

In fairness, it might only take one or two gigs to earn back your investment, and the included freelance coaching and training provided could jumpstart your writing career.

Contena’s main value proposition is as a time-saver. Since you don’t get paid for the time spent looking for gigs, many writers swear by it!

In summary:

  • Great for freelance writers
  • Curated database of well-paying legit writing jobs
  • Paid plans include freelance coaching and training like how to pitch and how to spruce up your portfolio

Click here to learn more.

9. Hired

Hired.com helps designers, engineers, data scientists, and managers by connecting them with prospective clients. Using artificial intelligence, Hired matches clients with candidates from their deep pool of talents with the results emailed out in just a few hours.

Unlike other recruitment services, Hired helps its talents by coaching and guiding them through the entire recruitment process.

One thing that’s cool about Hired is they also help you get the best offer by letting companies compete for your services instead of having you get into a bidding war with other workers.

The company caters to people looking for full-time, part-time, and freelance gigs.

In summary:

  • Tech-focused
  • Free to join
  • Many opportunities are for full-time traditional jobs, but you can find remote or part-time gigs
  • Earn top dollar

Click here to learn more and create your free Hired profile.

10. Toptal

Toptal.com is one of the leading freelance marketplaces but only caters to developers, designers, and finance experts.

With its strict and extensive screening process, clients are assured that they are only getting the top 3% of applicants in the given field. (Toptal stands for “top talent”.)

Toptal contractors do mostly remote work (you can pass on the jobs that don’t fit your schedule) and are paid very well. If you’re confident in your abilities and want to work with fast-growing startups and name-brand clients on challenging projects, this is the platform for you.

In summary:

  • Tech-focused
  • Free to apply
  • Earn great pay (think hundreds of dollars a week, even for part-time)

Click here to learn more and apply today.

11. Craigslist Gigs

Did you know that buried in the corner of Craigslist is a section specifically for side hustle opportunities? It’s called “gigs” and inside you’ll find everything from manual labor projects like moving or landscaping to graphic design to brand ambassador gigs for local events.

In just a few minutes of browsing I saw posts for writers, photographers, models, house cleaners, and tutors. Naturally, avoid any gigs that sound too good to be true and do your due diligence before meeting any strangers.

In summary:

  • Great for selling yourself locally
  • Good for one-off gigs or easy part-time jobs to earn extra cash
  • You have to sort through some scams to find legit gigs

12. TaskRabbit

TaskRabbit is perhaps a more organized and legit-feeling version of Craigslist Gigs. The company specializes in matching individuals and companies in need of short-term help with “taskers” (you).

Most of the gigs are local and in-person, but you can find some virtual opportunities as well. I used the platform as a customer to find a local handyman, and he told me he usually does 3-4 jobs a day and makes a good living on it.

My handyman charged $75 an hour, but other workers on TaskRabbit might start around $15-25 an hour. As your reputation and performance on TaskRabbit grows, you can increase your rates.

In summary:

  • Good for legit, local gigs
  • Revenue can grow as you do more jobs
  • Free to join

Click here to learn more and apply today.

13. Upwork

Upwork is perhaps the world’s largest freelance marketplace, which means it can be intensely competitive. Still, I’ve heard from several members that this is where their side hustle found its start.

Read More :   $8000 a Month, One Algebra Problem at a Time

Chris Misterek, a freelance web designer, gave the advice to think about your ideal client, and go above-and-beyond in your bids to those clients. Meanwhile, you can safely ignore all the other job posts.

As your profile and portfolio grow, Upwork will start to feature you more to prospective clients.

15. GigSalad

If you’re a musician, comedian, magician, DJ, photographer, bartender, or other entertainment pro, you should know about GigSalad. This popular marketplace helps connect you with customers hosting parties, weddings, or corporate events.

To join the site and create your profile, it costs $140-170 per quarter.

16. LinkedIn

On The Side Hustle Show, Helen Pritchard called LinkedIn “the only platform on the planet where you can handpick your audience.”

Her strategy involved crafting your profile so that it’s irresistible to your target client. That often means niching down to a very specific type of service, like “helping bankers lose weight,” or “PR for female entrepreneurs.”

Then, she’ll proactively send connection requests to those target prospects. (She advised to send 10 a day, every day of the week, to slowly build up your LinkedIn audience.)

At the same time, publish content on LinkedIn that will appeal to this target audience. Every so often, include a call-to-action to let your connections know you’re open for business.

17. Peopleperhour

Peopleperhour.com is another popular freelancing platform that helps you find jobs that you can do remotely. The site seems to have more traction in Europe, and gigs are mostly about graphic design, writing, SEO, and coding among others.

As a freelancer, you can bid on the jobs already posted, or create your own “hourlie” — a little package of what you’ll deliver for a fixed price. Rates are still competitive here, but often higher than similar packages on Fiverr.

In summary:

  • Great for virtual work
  • Bid on jobs or create your own service listing
  • Free to join

Click here to learn more.

18. Specialty Marketplaces

If you have a specific skill or service in mind, odds are there’s a specialty marketplace just for that. For example, you might consider:

19. Your Own Website

A website isn’t necessary for a lot of side hustlers starting out, but it can be an important element to your business to showcase your expertise, highlight your portfolio, and share testimonials from past clients.

In time, your content might be indexed by the search engines and potential customers can find you through Google local searches.

Here’s my free guide on the fastest and cheapest way to set up a website for your service business.

Your Turn

Marketing 101 says to get in front of your customers where they already are, and in this post I’ve tried to outline some common places your customers might be hanging out.

What do you think? What have you found as the most effective place to find side hustle gigs?

Let me know in the comments below!

Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I find side gigs near me?

To find side jobs near you, look at Craigslist, local Facebook community groups, NextDoor, or apps like Steady. These platforms have a steady stream of new side gig opportunities.

How can I find a side job that pays?

As freelancing and side hustling both become more mainstream, it’s quite common to have a side job these days. Through job sites and local networks, you can find gigs online and locally. Check out the full list of recommended side gig sites at Side Hustle Nation for more.

What are the most common side gigs?

Freelancing, brand ambassadorship, photography, and tutoring are among the most common side gigs. Handyman work and tapping into the gig economy through apps like Postmates and Instacart are popular as well.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button